thenewrepublic:

The Supreme Court halted the execution of Texas prisoner, Duane Buck, on Thursday. While his lawyers are not disputing Buck’s guilt, they argue that the 1997 testimony by a psychologist claiming that blacks are more likely to pose threats to the public in the future unfairly influenced the jury.
Kate Black, one of Buck’s defense attorneys:
“No one should be put to death based on the the color of his or her skin. We are confident that the court will agree that our client is entitled to a fair sentencing hearing that is untainted by considerations of his race”.
As evidenced by last Wednesday’s Republic Presidential Debate, Rick Perry’s celebration of capital punishment is echoed by much of this country. What’s more, TNR editors say that most liberals have long since abandoned their fight to abolish the death penalty in light of more polarizing domestic issues. Given the Supreme Court’s swift response, should Rick Perry be worried about how this affects his campaign and his longstanding belief in the “ultimate justice”?
Courtesy of Salon.com

The issue at hand isn’t Buck’s innocence, but the means by which his death sentence was obtained. Prosecutors firmly established Buck’s guilt, but to secure a capital punishment conviction in Texas they needed to prove “future dangerousness”—that is, provide compelling evidence that Buck posed a serious threat to society if he were ever to walk free. They did so in part with the testimony of a psychologist, Dr. Walter Quijano, who testified that Buck’s race (he’s African-American) made him more likely to commit crimes in the future. (Quijano answered in the affirmative to the question of whether “the race factor, [being] black, increases the future dangerousness for various complicated reasons.”)

Racist bullshit. 

"

In Texas, though, they do come close. In 2008, the district attorney of Harris County, Chuck Rosenthal, resigned after news emerged that he had sent and received racist e-mails. His office had sought the death penalty in 25 cases; his successor has sought it in 7. Of the total 32 cases, 29 involve a nonwhite defendant.

Since 1976, Texas has carried out 470 executions (well more than a third of the national total of 1,257). You can count on one hand the number of those executions that involved a white murderer and a black victim and you do not need to use your thumb, ring finger, index finger or pinkie.

Well, you might need the pinkie. On June 16, Texas executed Lee Taylor, who at age 16 beat an elderly couple while robbing their home. The 79-year-old husband died of his injuries. Mr. Taylor was sentenced to life in prison; there he joined the Aryan Brotherhood, a white gang, and, four years into his sentence, murdered a black inmate and was sentenced to death. When Mr. Taylor was executed, it was reported that he was the second white person in Texas executed for killing a black person. Actually, he should be counted as the first. The other inmate, Larry Hayes, executed in 2003, killed two people, one of whom was white.

"

— David R. Row, Death Penalty, Still Racist and Arbitrary, OP-ED in The New York Times

"

“Americans detained overseas rely on their access to U.S. consulates every day. If we expect other countries to abide by the treaties they join, the United States must also honor its obligations,” he said.

The Mexican government, which had vehemently opposed the execution, said Thursday evening it had filed a formal protest with the State Department for “violation of international law.”

“The Mexican government condemns in the most energetic terms the execution of Mexican national Humberto Leal Garcia,” the Mexican Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

The Mexican government criticized Texas authorities for failing to adhere to decisions by the International Court of Justice and for ignoring entreaties by the Obama administration, and it called on American authorities to respect the rights of Mexican detainees to be allowed access to their consulates.

"

David G. Savage, Texas Executes Mexican Over Objections of Obama Administration, The Los Angeles Times

(via untoldhistory)

Some facts - Garcia had been in the U.S. since he was 2 years old. Like the Dreamers fighting for their American status, Garcia was, by all accounts, American. 

He was convicted of torturing, raping and murdering a 16-year-old San Antonio girl, who had already been gang-raped at a party earlier. No one disputes this conviction - not even the Mexican government. 

Were Garcia’s rights violated? Yea. Are we seriously bitter over the execution of a sadistic piece of shit like this? I am not. Fuck that guy. 

I loathe Rick Perry but I am glad this asshole is dead. Fuck the Mexican government for reaching out to this sick asshole at the last minute. Why then are they not reaching out to the dreamers who are facing deportation…? Fuckers. And fuck Obama for pretending to give a shit. 

The whole thing is gross. If Ted Bundy was convicted of the same thing in Mexico I would hope that they’d execute him by firing squad. All of these international niceties are for assholes. 

(via amerikkkanstories)

Your blatant disregard for Garcia’s violation of rights is an indication of America’s acceptance of the post-legal nation we inhabit.  Ignoring an action’s legality simply because you like the outcome makes it easier for someone else’s rights to be violated.  Regardless of whether you believe this man is a “piece of shit”, he is a human, and he has rights that need to be protected.

(via untoldhistory)

Fuck Garcia and fuck anyone else that preys on children. He lost the right to call himself human the moment he committed inhuman acts. He was an American. He only invoked his Mexican citizenship at the moment before death. This was purely political theater. Notice how the media did not play up the fact that he had been in the US since he was 2 years old. 

Anyone that does that to a child can eat a shit sandwich and take a dirt nap. All the political niceties can get bent as the politicians frown at each other and say: tsk, tsk. If you want to defend child rapists and murderers that’s your business. 

(via amerikkkanstories)

What I defend are the rights of human beings, sir.  I refuse to dehumanize another human being, because when dehumanization occurs it becomes easier to disrespect someone’s rights.  

(via untoldhistory)

And who defended the rights of 16-year-old Adria Sauceda - the girl Garcia offered a ride home to after being gang-raped at a party - the girl he tortured, raped and murdered?? She was DEHUMANIZED. You want to explain to her parents that you are advocating his rights?? GTFO. 

On May 21, 1994, Leal kidnapped, raped, and murdered 16-year-old Adria Sauceda.[9] The girl had been at a party and become intoxicated, and a group of men gang-raped her. Leal is said to have offered to drive her home, and the two struggled when Sauceda tried to get out of the car a little distance away from the party.[10] Official court documents state “There was a 30- to 40-pound asphalt rock roughly twice the size of the victim’s skull lying partially on the victim’s left arm; Blood was underneath this rock. A smaller rock with blood on it was located near the victim’s right thigh.” There was also a 15 inches (380 mm) stick extending out of her vagina, with a screw at the end.[11] Leal claimed that she fell and hit her head.[10] No one was charged in the gang rape.[10]

You want to defend that??! Really? If you would rather defend the “rights” of a piece of garbage than the justice for an innocent 16-year-old girl then no, sir, fuck you

(via amerikkkanstories)

Using harsh language against me does nothing to strengthen your argument, from where I am standing, it demonstrates a lack of responsive debate.  Your position is a representation of the ‘us’ against ‘them’ dichotomy that plagues modern Americans.  Defending the rights of Mr. Garcia and defending the rights of his victim are not mutually exclusive and the death of Garcia is not justice for her either, it is the death of a human being.

In regards to Adria’s dehumanization, I would tell her parents exactly as I am telling you, Garcia is a human being.  Never have I condoned his actions, he confessed moments before he was executed.  But you fail to realize that despite his flaws, he is still a human being.  

(via amerikkkanstories-deactivated20)

"

"Americans detained overseas rely on their access to U.S. consulates every day. If we expect other countries to abide by the treaties they join, the United States must also honor its obligations," he said.

The Mexican government, which had vehemently opposed the execution, said Thursday evening it had filed a formal protest with the State Department for “violation of international law.”

"The Mexican government condemns in the most energetic terms the execution of Mexican national Humberto Leal Garcia," the Mexican Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

The Mexican government criticized Texas authorities for failing to adhere to decisions by the International Court of Justice and for ignoring entreaties by the Obama administration, and it called on American authorities to respect the rights of Mexican detainees to be allowed access to their consulates.

"

David G. Savage, Texas Executes Mexican Over Objections of Obama Administration, The Los Angeles Times