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thedailyfeed:

Before there was the iPad there was the letterpress. It’s an old-fashioned metal-and-grease machine — and it remains one of the most aesthetically pleasing printing methods. One of its masters is Dan Morris, who runs The Arm letterpress studio in Brooklyn, N.Y.

As a kid, Morris was enamored with his grandfather’s printing presses in Findlay, Ohio. His grandfather’s company was eventually dismantled during the fall of the American rust belt — the majority of his printing business came from local behemoth Marathon Oil, which relocated to Houston in 1990 — but Morris’ interest never waned. “I originally got excited about it back in Annapolis,” the Maryland city his family had relocated to from Ohio, “where all my friends were musicians,” Morris told The Daily. “They all needed CD packaging and band posters. And I can’t play an instrument, so it was my piece of the puzzle.” He couldn’t get his hands on his grandfather’s presses — they were more for industrial purposes — but he set up a small personal print shop in Annapolis.

Photos by Bryan Derballa for The Daily


peecharrific:

newwavefeminism:

motherjones:

More #occupywallstreet wisdom. Via Evan O’Brien.

on the backs of slave labor and stolen land.

with rivers of blood running down the streets.

peecharrific:

newwavefeminism:

motherjones:

More #occupywallstreet wisdom. Via Evan O’Brien.

on the backs of slave labor and stolen land.

with rivers of blood running down the streets.


cleolinda:

[Image description: two side-by-side versions of the same New York Times story. Parallel opening sentences are highlighted:
“After allowing them onto the bridge, the police cut off and arrested dozens of Occupy Wall Street demonstrators.”
“In a tense showdown over the East River, police arrested hundreds of Occupy Wall Street demonstrators after they marched onto the bridge’s Brooklyn-bound roadway.”
In hot pink, lower-case font over the graphic: “it only takes 20 minutes to shift the blame.”]
midwestmountainmama:

damekatharsis:

nerdling:

ritheory:

What the fuck. 

Fucked. Up. Did some googling - Colin Moynihan is the East Village community editor for the City Room blog, whereas Al Baker, the second writer whose credit was added to the revised article, is the Times’ police bureau chief. Explains the difference in perspective; one of them wants to tell the real story and the other wants to tell it from the cops’ point of view.

Really good fucking point.

woooooooooaaaaaah.

cleolinda:

[Image description: two side-by-side versions of the same New York Times story. Parallel opening sentences are highlighted:

“After allowing them onto the bridge, the police cut off and arrested dozens of Occupy Wall Street demonstrators.”

“In a tense showdown over the East River, police arrested hundreds of Occupy Wall Street demonstrators after they marched onto the bridge’s Brooklyn-bound roadway.”

In hot pink, lower-case font over the graphic: “it only takes 20 minutes to shift the blame.”]

midwestmountainmama:

damekatharsis:

nerdling:

ritheory:

What the fuck. 

Fucked. Up. Did some googling - Colin Moynihan is the East Village community editor for the City Room blog, whereas Al Baker, the second writer whose credit was added to the revised article, is the Times’ police bureau chief. Explains the difference in perspective; one of them wants to tell the real story and the other wants to tell it from the cops’ point of view.

Really good fucking point.

woooooooooaaaaaah.


latimes:

Downtown demonstration: Occupy LA protesters gather in front of Los Angeles City Hall on Saturday, Oct. 1, in this photo captured by Bullet Salvador.
Related: Economic protesters take to the streets in L.A.

latimes:

Downtown demonstration: Occupy LA protesters gather in front of Los Angeles City Hall on Saturday, Oct. 1, in this photo captured by Bullet Salvador.

Related: Economic protesters take to the streets in L.A.


thepoliticalnotebook:

#OccupyManchester. More than 20,000 people are currently taking part in the protests against Britain’s Tory Party and massive government spending cuts. The pictures above are from Twitter users @Marvscouncil and @RichardSearle of protests in Albert Square. The hashtags being used for this are #OccupyManchester #OccupyMCR #antitorymarch #oct2demo.

Read the BBC story.

Thanks to Tumblr user revolutiontrainee for alerting me to this.



" Hidden inside language are small, stealthy words that can reveal a great deal about your personality, thinking style, emotional state and connections with others. These words account for less than 0.1 per cent of your vocabulary but make up more than half of the words commonly used. Your brain is not wired to notice them but if you pay close attention, you will start to see their subtle power."
If your writing is sprinkled liberally with first-person pronouns (I, me, myself), you’re probably a pretty honest person. If, on the other hand, you eschew what The Secret Life of Pronouns author James W. Pennebaker calls “I-words” and use lots of articles (the, a, an) and prepositions (up, with), you might be hiding something. That is Pennebaker’s conclusion after 20 years of language research from a psychosocial perspective. Read more … (via utnereader)

utnereader:

The Project on Student Debt estimates that the average college senior in  2009 graduated with $24,000 in outstanding loans. In August 2010,  student loans surpassed credit cards as the nation’s single largest  source of debt, edging ever closer to $1 trillion. Yet for all the  moralizing about American consumer debt by both political parties, no  one dares call higher education a bad investment. The nearly axiomatic  good of a university degree in American society has allowed a higher  education bubble to expand to the point of bursting.
A good read to ring in the new school year.

utnereader:

The Project on Student Debt estimates that the average college senior in 2009 graduated with $24,000 in outstanding loans. In August 2010, student loans surpassed credit cards as the nation’s single largest source of debt, edging ever closer to $1 trillion. Yet for all the moralizing about American consumer debt by both political parties, no one dares call higher education a bad investment. The nearly axiomatic good of a university degree in American society has allowed a higher education bubble to expand to the point of bursting.

A good read to ring in the new school year.


Rick Perry has overseen 235 executions. Will he make it 236? 

The issue at hand isn’t Buck’s innocence, but the means by which his death sentence was obtained. Prosecutors firmly established Buck’s guilt, but to secure a capital punishment conviction in Texas they needed to prove “future dangerousness”—that is, provide compelling evidence that Buck posed a serious threat to society if he were ever to walk free. They did so in part with the testimony of a psychologist, Dr. Walter Quijano, who testified that Buck’s race (he’s African-American) made him more likely to commit crimes in the future. (Quijano answered in the affirmative to the question of whether “the race factor, [being] black, increases the future dangerousness for various complicated reasons.”)

Racist bullshit. 


thedailyfeed:

Reports of Gadhafi loyalists murdering captives reached a shocking climax when rebel fighters discovered 53 corpses in an abandoned cinderblock building. 

thedailyfeed:

Reports of Gadhafi loyalists murdering captives reached a shocking climax when rebel fighters discovered 53 corpses in an abandoned cinderblock building.